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2 GSA Buildings Win Top Industry Award

June 30, 2010


For the second consecutive year, a GSA facility was named the Building Owners and Managers Association Government Office Building of the Year. A second took top honors in the small office building category.

The Howard M. Metzenbaum U.S. Courthouse in Cleveland, one of the Great Lakes Region's most honored buildings adds another award as The Building of the Year in the government category.

The Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse in Port Huron, Michigan, also in GSA’s Great Lakes Region, won in the category of buildings with less than 100,000 square feet of space. The building is the oldest in the regional inventory, built in 1877.

“What an honor it is for this region to have two buildings recognized for demonstrating GSA’s commitment to energy-efficiency and sustainability,” said J. David Hood, acting regional administrator of the Great Lakes Region. “The awards, however, represent more than just trophies. They serve as a motivator for us to continue working hard to ensure we do what is best for the public and the environment.”

The International TOBY Awards were announced June 29 at the BOMA International Conference in Long Beach, Calif. GSA had eight buildings vying for one of the real estate industry's top honors, proving that its longstanding commitment to historic preservation, energy-efficiency and sustainability is paying off.

In addition to the Metzenbaum Courthouse, these GSA buildings competed in the government building category:

  • The Wayne Lyman Morse U.S. Courthouse in Eugene, Ore., the Pacific Northwest Region Building Owners and Managers Association winner. (GSA Northwest/Arctic Region)
  • Warren E. Burger Federal Building and United States Courthouse, St. Paul, Minn. (GSA Great Lakes Region)
  • Robert E. Coyle U.S. Courthouse in Fresno, Calif., which won the Pacific Southwest Regional Office Building of the Year Award. (GSA Pacific Rim Region)

Winner

Howard M. Metzenbaum U.S. Courthouse   Wayne Lyman Morse U.S. Courthouse in Eugene, Ore.
Constructed between 1902 and 1910, the Howard M. Metzenbaum U.S. Courthouse in Cleveland has almost 250,000 gross square feet of space. It was the first building completed as part of the “group plan,” a visionary effort to transform downtown Cleveland with the construction of a series of governmental buildings. The building was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1974, and in 1998 was renamed in honor of the former U.S. senator. A $51 million restoration transformed the stately structure into a modern-day treasure. The U.S. Green Building Council awarded the project certification in Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design in April 2006. The courthouse also earned the prestigious Energy Star in 2008.   The Wayne Lyman Morse Courthouse in Eugene, Ore., was constructed in 2006 and was designed by world renowned architect Thom Mayne and Morphosis, a Los Angeles architectural firm. It is named for a celebrated U.S. senator who represented Oregon from 1945 to 1969. The building construction is steel frame and concrete clad in stainless steel and glass, which accomplishes the building’s three main design goals: transparency, access, and civic engagement. This building has received many design and sustainability awards, including the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design gold certification from the U.S. Green Building Council.
Warren E. Burger Federal Building and United States Courthouse, St. Paul, Minn.   Robert E. Coyle U.S. Courthouse
 
The Warren E. Burger Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse serves as one of the anchors to St. Paul, Minn., connected to the city’s pedestrian skyway and affording tenants a picturesque view of the Mississippi River. With almost 500,000 square feet of space, the building underwent a three-year, $70 million modernization that created a 21st century workplace while adhering to its original 1960’s New Century Modernism design. The building recently achieved its LEED silver certification, and the building’s property management staff recently filed for an Energy Star award.   The 400,000-square-foot Robert E. Coyle U.S. Courthouse in Fresno, Calif., was constructed under GSA's Design Excellence Program and dedicated in October 2005. The building has an Energy Star rating of 86 and has demonstrated excellence in overall property management. Located in the civic district of downtown Fresno, the building has also had a tremendous impact on the community and has contributed significantly to the efforts of the city to revitalize the downtown area. The building is fully occupied by the U.S. Courts and court-related agencies.


Other categories included:

  • The Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse, Port Huron, Mich., is the GSA Great Lakes Region entry in the category of building with less than 100,000 square feet of space. This is the oldest building in the regional inventory, built in 1877.
  • The Pacific Rim’s Santa Ana (Calif.) Federal Building, which won the Pacific Southwest Regional Office Building of the Year, is competing in the renovated category.

 

Winner

Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse, Port Huron, Mich.   Pacific Rim’s Santa Ana Federal Building
The Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse, Port Huron, Mich., was designed by Alfred B. Mullett, best known for designing the San Francisco Mint. It was constructed in 1877, with such unique features as a cupola and ornate modified Corinthian capitals, characteristic of the Classical Revival Era. At 44,397 gross square feet, the building is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and has the distinction of being the oldest federal building in Michigan still occupied by the federal government. The building won Energy Star designation in 2008 and 2009.  In 2009 the building made the “Michigan Claim to Fame Buildings” list as the building with the greatest energy reduction in the previous year.   The Santa Ana Federal Building underwent renovation between 2003 and 2005. Work included seismic retrofitting; elevator modernization; restroom renovation; escalator removal; interior finishing; new cafeteria construction; exterior landscaping; and upgrades to the mechanical and electrical systems, fire alarm system, fire sprinklers, air handler units and ventilation systems, and building automation system. The Pacific Rim Region renovated the facility to provide a safe, secure, healthy, and comfortable environment for the building tenants and visitors while complying with applicable codes, standards, and regulations.


Competing in the historical building category were:

  • Robert A. Grant Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse, South Bend, Ind. (GSA Great Lakes Region)
  • The William Kenzo Nakamura U.S. Courthouse, Seattle, winner of the Pacific Northwest Region Building Owners and Managers Association award in the historic building category. (GSA Northwest/Arctic Region)


Robert A. Grant Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse, South Bend, Ind.   William Kenzo Nakamura U.S. Courthouse
The Robert A. Grant Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse, South Bend, Ind., was built in 1933, having been designed by the architectural firm of Austin & Shambleau in the Art Moderne and Art Deco style. The 136,000 gross-square-foot building was named after a local leader who served 35 years on the bench and 10 years as a U.S. congressman. The building is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. A 1983 renovation converted the building for use by the federal courts and support offices. The building won the Energy Star designation in 2008 with a score of 96 and won the Green Building Initiative's Green Globes certification of four globes. The building is operated in a very energy-efficient manner as evidenced by an 11 percent reduction in total energy usage since the Green Globes' 2003 base line.   The William Kenzo Nakamura U.S. Courthouse and U.S. Court of Appeals in Seattle underwent three years of renovation to provide an energy-efficient modernization of the building’s electrical and mechanical systems, seismic safety upgrades, security enhancements and historic restoration of the courtrooms and other interior spaces. The building is expected to receive Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design certification for its use of sustainable practices and materials. In 2001, the facility was named for Pvt. 1st Class William Kenzo Nakamura, a one-time internment camp detainee from Seattle. Nakamura later enlisted and was killed in battle in Italy during World War II. President Bill Clinton awarded Nakamura a posthumous Medal of Honor in 2000 for his heroism. The courthouse was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1980 for its national and local significance.

 

The Office Building of the Year award has 14 categories and is the highest honor of its kind that the real estate industry bestows. It is a comprehensive review that validates that a property has demonstrated operational efficiency and sound management, and that it excels in areas such as safety, security, risks management, training, and education.

The competition consists of three levels of judging. At the first level, buildings compete locally within the BOMA associations. Winning entries then advance to the regional level in each of the eight North American regions of BOMA International. Finally, regional winners advance to the international level.

This year would not be the first that one of GSA's 9,600 leased or owned buildings has won a BOMA International award. Last year, the GSA Pacific Rim Region’s Sandra Day O'Connor Courthouse in Phoenix took top honors in the government building category. That courthouse rounded out the nine nominees for last year's competition; this year's eight nominees also competed in 2009.

Additionally, several buildings have won local or regional awards, including the Jacob K. Javits Federal Building in New York, which was the BOMA-NY Government Building of the Year last winter. The award was presented at BOMA/NY’s recent 2009-2010 Pinnacle Awards ceremony, and despite the event being held during one of New York City’s major snowstorms, more than 300 guests attended the dinner.

The U.S. Courthouse in Hammond, Ind., and the Ralph H. Metcalfe Federal Building in Chicago were featured in the 2009 spring/summer issue of Chicagoland Office and Commercial, the Building Owners and Managers Association’s regional magazine. All Chicago-area winners of The Office Building of the Year were featured in this issue. The Hammond Courthouse was the winner of the BOMA/suburban Chicago government facility category in 2009, while the Metcalfe Federal Building won the BOMA/Chicago government building category. Metcalfe went on to win the regional Government Building TOBY. The magazine's cover photo is of the Hammond Courthouse lobby.


BOMA, TOBY