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U.S. Marine Corps Enlists with the GSA Fleet Consolidation of 4,713 vehicles will save $13.6 million during phase-in

GSA# 9355

October 30, 1996
Contact: Hap Connors
(202) 501-1231
hap.connors@gsa.gov

Recognizing the U.S. General Services Administration's efficiency and expertise in motor vehicle fleet management, the U.S. Marine Corps recently signed an agreement to turn over the management and operation of its non-tactical vehicle fleet of 4,713 vehicles to GSA's Interagency Fleet Management System (IFMS) during a four year phased consolidation.

The majority of vehicles to be consolidated are located in GSA's National Capital, Southeast, and Pacific Rim regions, but each of GSA's 11 regional offices will be providing support to various Marine active duty and reserve components. Initially, 1,367 vehicles will become part of GSA's IFMS at the beginning of fiscal year 1997, with approximately 1,100 vehicles scheduled for consolidation each year through FY 2000.

David J. Barram, acting GSA Administrator, said, "Our mission is to serve federal agencies with efficient and cost-effective services. We are proud to have earned the trust of the Marine Corps to manage their non-tactical fleet so they can focus on their national security mission."

Barram said that GSA's fleet management services are non-mandatory and are funded through reimbursable transactions with other federal agencies. "We must stay competitive to earn this business," he said.

During the four-year phase in, this consolidation will save the Marine Corps -- and the American taxpayer -- an estimated $13.6 million, and $5.4 million annually thereafter.

Today's announcement by GSA comes on the heels of earlier consolidation arrangements this year with Amtrack involving 1,153 vehicles and the Department of the Army fleet operations in Europe. Under that plan, GSA eventually will manage a fleet of more than 7,000 vehicles for the Army.

GSA currently manages 154,000 of the 590,000 vehicles used by government agencies and the U.S. Postal Service. GSA's fleet program leverages its resources with private sector services to maintain operation efficiencies. A financial analysis of GSA's fleet program conducted with the assistance of Arthur Andersen LLP last year showed significant cost savings when compared to similar private sector fleet services.

A 1993 National Performance Review reinvention lab gave GSA the opportunity to consolidate 6,683 vehicles from other federal agencies into its program, saving $7.4 million. Other management improvements over the years have netted savings of about $23 million.

Barram said, "Further downsizing of the federal workforce and hard financial data mean that we will pursue more opportunities to consolidate federal agency fleet programs into GSA's fleet services."

To find out more about GSA's fleet and other programs, visit GSA's homepage at http://www.gsa.gov.