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This is archived information. It may contain outdated contact names, telephone numbers, Web links, or other information. For up-to-date information visit GSA.gov pages by topic or contact our Office of Public Affairs at media@gsa.gov. For a list of public affairs officers by beat, visit the GSA Newsroom.

GSA Issues Environmental Report on Lorton GSA, District of Columbia Coordinate Removal of Contaminants

Archived news releases may contain contact names, telephone numbers, Web links, or other information that is outdated. You may reach a public affairs officer at 202-501-1231. For a list of public affairs officers by beat, visit http://www.gsa.gov/portal/content/101120.

GSA #9605

September 7, 1999
Contact: Viki Reath (202) 501-1231

The U.S. General Services Administration (GSA) has released an Environmental Site Assessment (ESA) of the Lorton Correctional
Complex, which has identified areas of environmental concern. GSA, as the temporary landholder, conducted the assessment to
evaluate potential environmental issues. The ESA documents are available at the Lorton and Pohick Branches of Fairfax County Public Library.

The D.C. Department of Corrections (DOC) has an ongoing Lorton environmental remediation program to deal with known environmental hazards.
As part of that program, DOC, in cooperation with GSA, has contracted for removal of tear-gas canisters and drums mentioned in the ESA. This
work should be completed by mid-November.

Agency officials are preparing an environmental cleanup cost estimate to submit to Congress this fall, as directed by the Lorton Technical Corrections
Act of 1998 (The Act).

The Act designated GSA as the agency in charge of disposing of the Complex's 3,000 acres in the southern portion of Fairfax County. The District of
Columbia has housed prisoners on this property since 1914 and must remove inmates by December 31, 2001. The Act directs GSA to waive the
regular disposal process. Instead Congress has asked GSA to follow a land reuse plan approved by Fairfax County Board of Supervisors.
Under that plan a maximum amount of land would be used for open, park, and recreational space.